All posts tagged: Learning

Build your Skills: Learning Agility

The concept of Learning Agility dates back to 1970, when American author Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock, investigated the move from the traditional industrial age to a new age dominated by Information. He crafted a new definition of what literacy meant, anticipating by a decade the more complete definitions of Learning Agility: The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn Alvin Toffler, Future Shock, 1970 The switch from a concept of Literacy based on the simple accumulation of “stocks” of information, changes into a fluid model where the learning and unlearning have the same relevance. It’s this dynamic element that is the innovative portion of this skill’s definition. Today this skill is in high demand, and has been strongly associated with Leadership. Put simply, “it’s the ability to be in a novel situation, not know what to do, and then figure it out anyway. Individuals who learn the ‘right’ lessons from past experiences are high in learning agility, …

Need number 2: Develop people internally

So, we’ve seen that instead of choosing the best talent to get into your organization, it is probably wiser to focus on a good candidate. One of the goal is to make sure the candidate you have chosen can become “productive” as soon as possible in your organisation. Which is why your people development processes play a key role in making sure your HR function really supports your organisation business needs. From Training to Development. In many organisations Learning & Development has always been the last department of HR. Last to be formed, last to get a budget, last to be part of the HR strategy of an organisation. To a certain extent, in many organisations the recent wave of “talent” management has at least had the capability of revising the role that learning plays in the development of people. But it is not enough. First of all, in many companies we are not even able to talk about learning, as the focus is purely on training activities. What is the difference between the two …

Be afraid of “Team Building”

As a Training Manager I have always been afraid of Managers and HR Business Partners coming along and asking for a “Team Building” course for this area. To be fair, I’ve nothing against the concept of Team Building. But what I’m sure is that in my experience way too often the idea of a Team Building exercise is way too often suggested as a (wrong) solution to a plethora of different needs and requirements. Most of them way too often linked to the inability of a manager to perform its role as a manager and a as a team leader. I’ve always considered I was doing a good job as a training manager when I would come out of the meeting to discuss the “team building” need, having agreed that a Team Building course was not a solution. Plus, I’ve always been very diffident if the request was also directed towards a very specific types of course, usually “extreme” off-sites. Just to give an example, I had once a discussion with a manager who claimed …